UrbanPlan In The Classroom

UrbanPlan aligns with state educational content standards. All teachers on the curriculum development team teach in traditional classrooms in traditional public schools.

UrbanPlan In The Classroom

ULI New York’s UrbanPlan Schools

We are currently volunteering with students from the following NYC schools:

High Schools:

  • Brooklyn Technical High School
  • St. Raymond High School for Boys
  • Urban Assembly School for Design & Construction

New Schools Coming 2018-19 Academic Year! Fordham University’s Real Estate Institute and NYU Wagner will kick off UrbanPlan at the graduate university level this coming fall and spring!

Since the program’s New York City debut in 2003, UrbanPlan has reached over 5,000 students at 9 schools, including: Brooklyn Technical High School, Murry Bergtraum High School, St. Raymond High School for Boys, Stuyvesant High School, Boerum Hill School for International Studies, The Bronx High School of Science, Poly Prep Country Day School, High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology, and Urban Assembly School of Design and Construction.

The New York District Council is grateful for the support of the dedicated teachers and school administrators!

UrbanPlan for High Schools

UrbanPlan is offered at over 30 high schools in economics or government courses in the junior and senior years. In the 15 class hours of the curriculum, students form development teams to respond to a “request for proposals” for the redevelopment of a blighted site in a fictional community. Each team member assumes one of five roles: Finance Director, Marketing Director, City Liaison, Neighborhood Liaison, or Site Planner.

Through these roles, students develop a visceral understanding of how various market forces (supply and demand, availability of capital, risk vs reward, etc.) clash and collaborate with non-market forces (regulation, politics, advocacy groups, etc.) to create the built environment. They must reconcile the often-competing agendas to create a well-designed, market-responsive, financeable, and buildable project.

Create Engaged Citizens

The curriculum was developed for and is only supported in economics and selected government classes. The curriculum aligns with all state and national content standards for high school economics and provides a much-needed local government component to government classes.

How UrbanPlan Works in the Classroom

Teams address challenging financial, market, social, political, and design issues, develop a pro forma, and create a three-dimensional model of their plan. At strategic times during the project, land use professionals, who have attended a full day of UrbanPlan volunteer training, interact with the student teams. There are two facilitations where professionals visit the teams and challenge the students on their roles, their vision, and the decisions they have made using Socratic interaction. The module culminates when the teams present their proposal to a “City Council” of ULI members that awards the development contract to the winning team.

Facilitators

Through Socratic interaction, volunteers challenge the students to think more critically about the UrbanPlan issues and the specific responsibilities of their “role” (Financial Analyst, Marketing Director, Site Planner, City Liaison, Neighborhood Liaison).

Presenters

UrbanPlan volunteers engage in interactive discussions with students on the member’s own project work. Through thoughtful questioning, the presenter helps students relate these issues and decisions to struggles the students are experiencing in UrbanPlan.

City Council

UrbanPlan volunteers hear student presentations, challenge their proposals as would happen in an actual city council hearing, and award the development contract to the winning development team.

Is UrbanPlan right for you and your students?

Every teacher teaching UrbanPlan has asked the same questions you are probably asking yourself now:

  • Can my students perform optimally on their standardized and/or AP tests if I incorporate UrbanPlan in my curriculum?
  • Will the value of the student takeaway be commensurate with the 15 class hours the program requires?
  • I teach 3 to 5 classes a day. I have no time to recruit or manage volunteers and no budget for any materials. Can a real teacher in a real school do this?

These teachers, including those in some of the country’s most demanding high schools have answered “Yes.” Additionally, over 98% of all teachers who introduce UrbanPlan in their curriculum continue teaching the program.

High School Teachers Training Webinar
This video is for trained UrbanPlan high school teachers, District Council Chairs and UrbanPlan staff who work with teachers, classroom materials, teacher and volunteer schedules.  Teachers will learn all content and format modifications that affect pedagogy and student outcomes.

UrbanPlan for Universities

UrbanPlan for Universities aims to develop land use professionals–developers, planners, architects, investors, and policy makers–who are more sophisticated and effective when they enter the workforce. UrbanPlan moves students from a theoretical and ideological understanding of their discipline to the practical realities and demands of the development team and process. In addition, the module is a challenging team building exercise and introduction to ULI and key leaders in the industry.

In the 12-15 hour unit, students address challenging financial, market, social, political, and design issues, develop a pro forma, and create a three-dimensional model of their plan. The module culminates when the teams present their proposal to a “City Council” of ULI members that awards the development contract to the winning team.

Who is UrbanPlan for?

In UrbanPlan for Universities, the primary target is graduate students whose focus is land use: city and regional planning, business, real estate, architecture, and law. It can be effective in carefully selected fourth-year undergraduate classes where the course ties into land use.

How UrbanPlan Works in the Classroom

Facilitators

At strategic times during the project, land use professionals who have been trained in the UrbanPlan curriculum, interact with the student teams. Through the Socratic method, these volunteers visit the teams and challenge the students to think more critically about the UrbanPlan issues and the specific responsibilities of their “roles” (Financial Analyst, Marketing Director, Site Planner, City Liaison, Neighborhood Liaison).

Presenters

UrbanPlan volunteers engage in interactive discussions with students on the member’s own project work or specific professional challenges. Through thoughtful questioning, the presenter helps students relate these issues and decisions to struggles the students are experiencing in UrbanPlan.

City Council

UrbanPlan volunteers hear student presentations, challenge their proposals as would happen in an actual city council hearing, and award the development contract to the winning development team.